November 2017


Message from the President

INTRODUCING INCOMING PRESIDENT MARK MITSUDA

Mark Mitsuda grew up in Honolulu Hawaii, and was introduced to glass during high school at Punahou School.  Mark went on to art school and graduated with a BFA from Alfred University in 1992. He has studied with numerous glass artists at Pilchuck Glass School and has worked as a studio assistant for Rick Mills at the University of Hawaii.  In the mid 90’s he co-found Glass Design Group, a limited production studio glass studio in upstate New York.  In 1998 he returned to Honolulu to teach glassblowing at Punahou School where he is currently the head of the glass program.   He has taught at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina and has been a resident artist at the Appalachian Center for Craft in Smithville Tennessee. He has served on the board of Hawaii Glass Artists, has been a board member and secretary of Hawaii Craftsmen. He currently serves as president on the Executive Board of Hawaii Craftsmen and program chair for Aha Hana Lima.  His current body of work explores utilitarian vessels though the lens of Venetian technique and contemporary design.  He is in numerous private collections as well as the State Foundation for Culture and the Arts.


Aloha Hawaii Craftsmen member,

I just wanted to send out a huge mahalo to all of our talented artists and hard working volunteers that have made the Annual Statewide Juried Exhibition such a success not only this year, but consistently from year to year. It is with a heavy heart that we bid farewell to Barbara Thompson as she transitions to a life as a Big Island artist and resident. She has led her team of ASJE volunteers for the last three years and will be greatly missed. I would also like to acknowledge Terry Savage and his leadership as acting president of Hawaii Craftsmen. Terry will be stepping down from his role as acting president and will continue service to the executive board as secretary. We are continuing to search for a treasurer on the executive committee and welcome any suggestions that anyone in the community may have.

We are in the planning stages of Aha Hana Lima 2018 and are looking forward to hosting artists in ceramics, wood and metal for this coming season of workshops. If you have any suggestions or have been dying to take a class from an artist that you love, please let us know as we gather names of artists for this year’s workshops. You can send your thoughts to:

info@hawaiicraftsmen.org

If you have any concerns regarding Hawaii Craftsmen or if you just want to send me a note, please feel free to drop me a line at:

president@hawaiicraftsmen.org

Looking forward to another great 50 years.

Mark Mitsuda
President, Hawaii Craftsmen
Aha Hana Lima Chair

THX.

Hawaii Craftsmen 50th Annual Statewide Juried Exhibition

 


Artwork by Harue McVay and photography by Jon Rawlings

OCTOBER 25-NOVEMBER 10, 2017

HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART SCHOOL
MAIN GALLERY
1111 VICTORIA ST. 
HONOLULU, HI 96814
(808) 532-8741

Gallery Hours

Closed Mondays
Tu. - Sa. 10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Su. 1:00 - 5:00 pm 

Free for public viewing

NOVEMBER 10

POST-EXHIBITION ART PICKUP 4:30-8:00 PM 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: WWW.HAWAIICRAFTSMEN.ORG
WWW.CALLFORENTRY.ORG
INFO@HAWAIICRAFTSMEN.ORG
OR (808) 521-3282

2017 AWARDS

PAGE CHANG, HE ‘E MALO, 2017
Award of Excellence in Honor of Charles E. Higa, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $1000

ALAN NESS, BLUE PULEGOSO FADE #1, 2017
George Ellis Award, Sponsored by The Timothy Y. C. Choy Fund of the Hawaii Community Foundation, $500

DANIEL HARANO RUNNY GREEN KALEIDONISM, 2017
Carol Malcom Koga Emerging Artist Award, Sponsored by The Timothy Y. C. Choy Fund of the Hawaii Community Foundation, $500

BOB MCWILLIAMS, TEAPOT, 2017
Merit Award in Ceramics Arts, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $250

MARQUES MARZAN, PA U AHA (CORD SKIRT), 2017
Merit Award in Fiber Arts, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $250

JONATHAN SWANZ, LIGHT BUNDLE: ACCUMULATION, 2015
Merit Award in Glass Arts, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $250

GEORGE WOOLLARD, ESTHER, LOUISE, & THELMA, 2017
Merit Award in Wood Arts, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $250

BAI XIN CHEN, BOTTOM OF THE GRAVITY WELL, 2017
Merit Award in Metal Arts, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $250

ROBERT DUFFER, RELEASE SYSTEM, 2017
Merit Award in Mixed Media Arts, Sponsored by the Peter Drewliner Trust, $250

DON MATSUMURA, CHARACTER, 2015, SUMO, 2015 AND ELEGANCE, 2016
The Pegge Hopper Award, Sponsored by Pegge Hopper Galleries, $250 

CAROL YOTSUDA, I’LL CROSS THE BRIDGE WHEN I COME TO IT, 2017 & WHEN CAROL FINALLY TAKES A VACATION, 2017
50th Anniversary Award, Sponsored by the Garden Island Arts Council, $250

KATHY TOSH, LIVING IN ALIGNMENT, 2017
Hawaii Handweaver’s Hui Award, Sponsored by Hawaii Handweaver’s Hui, $100

EMILY DUBOIS, ALA MOANA, 2017
Honorable Mention Awards, Sponsored by Hawai’i Craftsmen, $100

KARUNA SANTORO, MORNING COMES SLOWLY - TRIPTYCH, 2017
Honorable Mention Awards, Sponsored by Hawai’i Craftsmen, $100

FOREST LEONARD, NA MOKULUA, 2017
Honorable Mention Awards, Sponsored by Hawai’i Craftsmen, $100

SHOP THE ANNUAL SHOW ONLINEhttps://squareup.com/store/hawaiicraftsmen

If you donʻt see it here, It has already sold !


Workshops & Opportunities

 

CALL FOR ARTISTS: FILIPINO VETERANS WWII

The Art in Public Places Program of the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts (SFCA), is requesting qualifications from individual artists for artwork to be commissioned for a monument to commemorate the Filipino veterans of World War II who fought alongside the Allied forces. Through this RFQ we intend to establish a qualified pool of professional artists for consideration. Additional information including eligibility and selection criteria are included in the Call Detail on CallForEntry.org (CaFÉ). Direct link to Call Detail on CaFÉ: SFCA Request for Qualifications. You can also search for the Call Detail by searching for State Foundation on Culture and the Arts on the Call Listings page. Applications will be accepted online only through CaFÉ: www.callforentry.org

Read more on our website: Call for Entry - Filipino Veterans WWII Memorial


“HAWAII CRAFTSMEN CELEBRATES FINE CRAFT AS A VITAL AND ENRICHING PART OF CONTEMPORARY LIFE AND SUPPORTS THE CREATIVE GROWTH OF OUR MEMBER ARTISTS AND THE EDUCATION OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO THE VALUE OF THE CRAFTS.” 

Spotlight

CUT AND DYED


Reprinted with permission from Hele Mai Magazine

By Catherine Cluett Pactol

Deep in the lush Molokai valley of Honouliwai, artist and entrepreneur Tanya Maile Naehu has created a clothing line that reflects her family's off-the-grid lifestyle and the beauty of her landscape. She left her full time job a few years ago to pursue a hobby-turned-business, MyLei. Her clothing features one-of-a kind colorfully dyed patterns, soft, luxurious fabrics and hand-cut designs, with sales growing all over Hawaii.

"The coolest thing about my clothing -- besides my putting love into every piece -- is that it's all dyed with the stream water that flows through my home," says Naehu. "It's made from beginning to end with no electricity... it's a real reflection of our lifestyle and who we are -- just simplicity all the way, and a lot of love."

Naehu uses a combination of natural dye materials from her garden and Molokai's land and sea, along with batik dyes, to create her colorful pieces. She and her family live in a home her husband built himself, off the grid using solar energy and cool stream water running through their faucets. Her workshop is her breezy deck, overlooking the verdant mountainsides and ocean in the distance.

Growing up in an artistic household, Naehu's love of creativity came naturally. Yet she always considered art a hobby, not a job. That changed in the holiday season of 2012, when her family was on a tight budget and she was trying to figure out what to give her friends. She decided to make tie-dyed scarf lei from old T-shirts -- and her gifts got rave reviews.

A full time teacher for 15 years, Naehu began experimenting in her free time with colors and patterns. A year and a half later, she took the leap to leave her job and start her own business, also allowing her to stay home with her two-year-old daughter.

"It was probably the best move I ever made," she says. "It was really scary and risky at first, but I knew we would be OK."

Naehu admits the transition was tough, but the risk paid off. Within two years of taking her hobby full time, she was able to make the equivalent of her former teacher's salary.

While MyLei now allows Naehu to financially support her family, the business is much deeper for her. Steeped in the healing properties of the Hawaiian herbs she uses to dye, Naehu hopes the clothing will be as curative for those who wear it as the creating process has been for her.

Diagnosed with lupus when she was 28, Naehu says the decision to begin a healing process through creating art "definitely improved my life in every way."

"I use olena [Hawaiian turmeric root] and alaea [red clay] to dye, and it's medicinal too, so I love that aspect of it: being able to wear olena and alaea -- things you would use for medicine -- to adorn yourself," she says. "How beautiful is that?"

As her creativity grew -- using upcycled T-shirts, natural fabrics and a pair of scissors to make intricate cut patterns -- so did the depth of Naehu's creation rituals.

"It became more than just dying something," she says. "It was the practice of gathering. There is  protocol that I practice as a Hawaiian cultural practitioner -- I ask permission, I pule, before I make every piece... I always have this ritual where I ask the energies of the universe, Ke Akua, to put lots of love into every piece, because I know that energy gets transferred to whoever I'm giving it to."

She harvests olena root, soaks it with the fabric for three days in a bucket, and it emerges a bright, golden yellow, while alaea brings a rosy orange. Naehu also uses batik dyes to create even more color variations. Hawaiian salt adds a speckled, watercolor effect. 

After dying, each piece gets shaped -- often with hundreds of cuts in the fabric -- into scarves, ponchos, netted coverups and other artistic apparel pieces. Her signature feather ponchos -- with hand gathered and tied feathers hanging from the edges -- take up to 12 hours each to create. Prices range from $25 for scarves up to $225 for the feather pieces. Naehu says 90 percent of her creations can be worn at least three different ways.

Creating is only half the challenge; as an entrepreneur, marketing is key.

Naehu credits Wailani Tanaka, owner of Something for Everybody, a local business that fosters Molokai artists, with her first big break. Tanaka carried Naehu's clothing line in the store,  then invited Naehu to join her at Merrie Monarch, the world renowned hula festival in Hilo -- which launched MyLei into the public eye. She has now been selected to market her products all three years of the Made in Maui County Festival. In 2015, she was invited to be the first Molokai artist in the MAMo Wearable Arts show for Native Hawaiian designers. Last year, Naehu was also a vendor at the statewide Made in Hawaii showcase; afterward, she was selected to be the only artist from that event featured in a KITV special.

Naehu is quick to recognize the growing number of Molokai entrepreneurs who are all creating one of a kind products.

"There's this beautiful thing that's happening on Molokai, and I always brag about it," she says. "All these young mothers and women are [becoming] these upcoming entrepreneurs," she says. "Like 90 percent of the [Molokai] vendors are women, [making] quality beautiful products unlike other stuff you see out there, and it's a reflection of these women and their lifestyle. I'm really honored to call them my friends... we've supported each other."

On Molokai, Naehu's products are available at Something for Everybody and Art from the Heart in Kauanakakai. On Maui, you can buy her clothing at Simmer in Paia, the Hyatt Regency Hotel, and Ho`omana Spa in Makawao. They're also available for purchase online through her website, www.myleialoha.com. 

Exhibitions

 

IRRESISTIBLE RESIST: THE ART OF INDIAN DYES AND DESIGN

OCTOBER 29, 2017 - FEBRUARY 11, 2018
EAST WEST CENTER GALLERY


MAYOR JALABAI KHALIFA WEARING A TIE-DYE SADLA, BHADALI, BHUJ, GUJARAT,2016  PHOTOGRAPHER: GAYLE GOODMAN


Gallery Info:
East-West Center Gallery
John A. Burns Hall, 1601 East-West Road (corner Dole St. & East-West Rd.)
Honolulu, HI 96848

Hours: Weekdays: 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Sundays Noon-4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays and holidays.

Admission: Free of charge

Information: 808-944-7177

Guided gallery tours will be offered Sundays at 3:00 p.m.
(No tour on January 21, 2018)


BETWEEN OCEAN AND SKY, THE FEELING OF MOVEMENT, PETRICHOR FALL, AND INTO THE WOODS

NOVEMBER 16, 2017 - FEBRUARY 09, 2018 
FIRST HAWAIIAN CENTER



BeniceExhibition Overview

Between Ocean and Sky: Hana Yoshihata 

Hawai'i-island artist Hana Yoshihata is inspired by her experiences on traditional voyaging canoes such as the Hokule‘a. Working on sheets of paper placed flat on the floor or table, Yoshihata applies sea and fresh water, and adds ink and paint, allowing them to flow together and dry freely. She often combines this technique with detailed brushwork of linear patterns and forms, resulting in sensual, layered surfaces that evoke coastal and submerged topography, or the vastness of the night sky.

The Feeling of Movement: Sculptural Woodwork of Derek Bencomo

Maui-based wood artist Derek Bencomo uses the wood’s natural shape and grain lines to create fluid pieces that curve and stretch out in three dimensions. His works appear to be crawling or dancing on spider-or-anemone-like legs or call to mind natural shapes such as shells, leaves or flower buds.

Petrichor Fall: Dana Brewer

Dana Brewer draws inspiration from the natural world and from the power of heat and gravity used in the creation of her glass forms. Her installation designed for the First Hawaiian Center gallery features multiple blown glass leaves and is reminiscent of the shape and movement of a waterfall.

Into the Woods: Hiroko Sakurai

Artist and paper conservator Hiroko Sakurai exhibits images of trees on multi-panel screens, scrolls, and mixed-media paintings on wood. Her works express a stillness and tranquility in their simplified forms and employ meticulous handwork, often borrowed from traditional art and craft techniques, which she practices repeatedly and patiently, as though the process were a kind of meditation.

MIXED MEDIA MINIATURE No 20

NOVEMBER 16  - DECEMBER 16, 2017
KOA GALLERY

Opening Reception on Thursday, Nov. 16  4:30-7:30 pm


MATCHBOOK PLUS XIII

NOVEMBER 17TH - DECEMBER 30TH
CEDAR STREET GALLERIES


BODY OF WORKJUNE 29, 2017 - APRIL 29, 2018
HONOLUL
U MUSEUM OF ART


Exhibition Overview

Since Paleolithic peoples carved female fertility symbols from stone, we have been fascinated by our own image, and are driven to represent that form in art. Self-representation helped our ancestors create meaning in a dangerous, unknown world, and artists today use the human form to communicate desires, ideologies, and individual and cultural experiences. 

These primarily American and European paintings, sculptures, photographs and works on paper, drawn from the museum’s modern and contemporary collection, focus on the human figure in classically inspired works as well as personal and experimental pieces that challenge viewers’ preconceptions. See works by such artists as Robert Arneson, Elmer Bischoff, Robert Colescott, Robert Mapplethorpe, Vik Muniz, Mickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, and Tom Wesselmann that deal with themes such as religion and spirituality, identity, gender, and politics.

This was the final collection-based exhibition organized by Curator of Contemporary Art James Jensen, who sadly passed away in April. His knowledge of the collection, attention to detail, and dedication to the museum will never be forgotten.

ROBERTA GRIFFITH | UNPLEASANT CONVERSATIONS



THE JOHN DOMINIS AND PATCHES DAMON HOLT GALLERY
HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART
900 S. BERETANIA STREET
HONOLULU, HI 96814

JULY 28 TO NOVEMBER 12, 2017

Opening Reception for general pubic:
July 28-6- 9pm, 2017

Artist Statement

I have incorporated image transfers into my ceramic work since the 1970s. Research for my current project started three years ago when I began painting abstract compositions with underglaze colors, including text, on thin porcelain sheets, then kiln-firing them for permanence. Titled, The NO Series, the text consisted of one word, which began with NO and expanded to include the words NEVER, NOT, NOPE, NOTHING and NO-NO. These negatives are a visual response to natural and man-made disasters, political and social conflicts, and incivilities that plague our contemporary world.

Unpleasant Conversations consists of white porcelain plates and cups installed in the gallery. Decals made from four black ink NO Series drawings are attached to the plates and cups though kiln-firing. While the cups are installed in disarray on a black table in the center of the gallery, the plates are installed on a yellow band encircling the area. The yellow band, which recalls a yellow caution tape, is bisected by a continuing red line with an arrow that delineates space in various ways. First, as a reference to the horizon line, and therefore, distant space; second, as part of an encircling band, which wraps around and encloses the space encouraging conversation; and third, as an arrow which directs the eye around the area. Normally red signals stop, or the ceasing of movement, yet here it acts to encourage the viewers’ movement around the gallery.

The idea of conversation is further examined through variations of the text. The printed words act as declarations, but also as responses, echoes or even yells, among the plates and the cups or among people. The simple black panels with white text on the circular plates and cups, coupled with the communal reference to the sharing of food and drink, pull people in. At the same time, the words on these everyday objects push people away, reflecting the overwhelming negativity, divisiveness and hostility often found in society today.

Roberta Griffith

Members, do we have your Current Information ?

We are making sure that we have all members' current contact information to keep everyone informed and up to date on Hawaii Craftsmen events and opportunities. We are also tracking members' preferred art medium to help us make decisions about what programs to provide. Please take the time to sign in at Hawaiicraftsmen.org, update your contact information, and adjust your membership level or status as needed, so we can serve you better!

Support Hawaiʻi Craftsmen Today

For 50 years, Hawaiʻi Craftsmen has relied on the generosity of members, supporters, and volunteers like you, who have helped us accomplish our mission to serve as an integral part of the fine craft community, promote fine crafts throughout the state, and support our community of member artists. Help Hawaiʻi Craftsmen continue the sustainability and growth of its programs and events today by making a tax-deductible monetary contribution—however large or small— by sending us a check or contributing online.

Newsletter Call for Content

Is your work in an upcoming exhibit? Do you know of a lecture or event that might be of interest to our membership? Please let us know by sending an email to newsletter@hawaiicraftsmen.org by October 14th for inclusion in the next newsletter.

Request for Hawaii Craftsmen Historical Documents

Do you have any photographs, newspaper articles, program files, or other information from past Hawaii Craftsmen events? We would love to centralize our archives and fill in any missing holes in our history. Please contact us at info@hawaiicraftsmen or call us at (808) 521-3282.

Check out our Archive HERE

Volunteers Needed

As a volunteer organization, Hawaiʻi Craftsmen relies on the active participation of its members in volunteering for a wide range of tasks that help us deliver our programs to members and the community. Please consider volunteering as a coordinator or member on one of the following committees. To sign up to volunteer, please visit our volunteer web page.

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have interest/experience in membership development and will assist in membership outreach, building greater active membership, and soliciting updates of member contact and interests information. 


VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have interest/experience in organizing volunteers; gathering data on volunteer skills, interests, and expertise; and working with program chairs and event coordinators to contact, solicit, and schedule volunteers. 


FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE 

Committee members should have an interest/experience in fundraising, particularly in working with donors and corporate sponsors. Members will be tasked with developing sponsorship packages, with outreach to potential donors and corporate sponsors, and with soliciting gifts in kind and/or monetary donations for programs and events. 

To sign up to volunteer, please visit our volunteer web page.


Board of Directors Nominations

The board is currently seeking nominations for the executive position of President and Treasurer of the Board of Directors. The President is the principle executive officer of the organization; presides at all meetings of the members and of the Board of Directors; is primary signatory to contracts and documents; and, in general, supervises the activities and operations of Hawaiʻi Craftsmen. The Treasurer oversees the financial operations of the organization. These positions require excellent leadership, organizational and people skills, as well as a strong understanding of fine craft arts. 

Please send your recommendations/nominations (self-nominations are welcome) and brief biographical information of potential candidates to Terry Savage, Acting President, at tsavage39@gmail.com 

Find us on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram

    

YOUR HC SOCIAL MEDIA TEAM IS INCREASING OUR PRESENCE ON THE INTERNET !  

ON INSTAGRAM

@hawaiicraftsmen #hawaiicraftsmen #hawaiicraftsmenmember

Tag us with your work-in-progress photos, your studio shots, your current shows, your inspirations! We’ll be happy to repost them on the IG page!


 FACEBOOK

Send your request to join in the discussion then,

Post upcoming shows & events you’d like to share, post a view from your studio, post questions for other members, and make connections :) We’ll help share those posts and get the word out.


PINTEREST

Join us on this image based platform to discover new skills, new artists and global contemporary craft.


Amazon Smile

HOW DOES AMAZON SMILE WORK ?

When first visiting AmazonSmile, customers are prompted to select a charitable organization from almost one million eligible organizations. In order to browse or shop at AmazonSmile, customers must first select a charitable organization. For eligible purchases at AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to the customer’s selected charitable organization.  Click the link for more information.

Shop for everyone on your gift list this holiday at smile.amazon.com/ch/99-0180884 
and Amazon donates to Hawaii Craftsmen.

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Support us when you shop this holiday season


AMAZON SMILE

“YOUR INVOLVEMENT IS VITAL TO CONTINUE TO MAKE HAWAI’I CRAFTSMEN A SUCCESS.”

Board Meeting

Hawaii Craftsmen meets the Third Wednesday of the month and the meeting is open to members.  If you would like to attend, please sign up at Hawaiicraftsmen.org under Events.

HAWAII CRAFTSMEN IS SUPPORTED BY THE HAWAI’I STATE FOUNDATION ON CULTURE AND THE ARTS,  THE HAWAII COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, THE ATHERTON FAMILY FOUNDATION, THE COOKE FOUNDATION, THE MCINERNY FOUNDATION, THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, THE LAILA TWIGG-SMITH ART FUND, SEVERAL PRIVATE FAMILY FOUNDATIONS AND OUR MEMBERSHAWAI‘I CRAFTSMEN 1110 NUUANU AVE, HONOLULU, HI 96817info@hawaiicraftsmen.org • 808-521-3282

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